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“EarthBreaker!, a new science-fiction comedy by Minnesota-based writer/director Chad Martin, is poised to commence its crowd-funding campaign on the Indiegogo site on Sunday, Jan. 27, 2013. The film will use all local talent.
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EarthBreaker!
EarthBreaker!

PRLog (Press Release)Jan. 19, 2013 – “EarthBreaker!”, a new science-fiction comedy by Minnesota-based writer/director Chad Martin, is poised to commence its crowd-funding campaign on the Indiegogo site on Sunday, Jan. 27— http://www.indiegogo.com/earthbreaker.  The film will use all local talent. Provided funding is secured, filming will start this spring and the proposed release date will be around the holidays of this year. The teaser trailer and Indiegogo funding site pitch for the film follow.

Help us make it, then watch us break it!

What is “EarthBreaker!” and why the heck should you support its creation?

Imagine “North by Northwest” meets “Spaceballs” at a café for scones and they’re joined by the Monty Python clan as they trade double entendres with Austin Powers via Skype. Morph them all together and you’d have a movie filled with intrigue and suspense plaguing a group of space travelers (including a hapless hero and super-sexy heroine) being greatly pestered—threatened even—by their evil nemeses, whilst simmering in a stock of lots of low-brow, screwball humor. These are then all congealed together with groundbreaking performances, cutting-edge visual effects, ear-shattering sound design, mind-blowing storytelling, vomit-inducing stupidity, eye-rolling ridiculousness, funny-looking spaceships, fake starfields and cheesy laser guns.

What’s not to love?

The plot: Gary David Keast stars as Jeff Cranston, a high school music teacher who is accidentally teleported from Earth and becomes caught in the middle of an intergalactic conflict of epic proportions! Evil space demon Antagonus Wratch (Eric Lee) and his executive officer Klard (John Hedlund) are hot on the trail of scientist Nigel Reinhart’s (Daniel Sjerven) accidental invention, the HMG, a weapon of such power it could destroy entire galaxies, even the universe itself! With the help of space jockeys Dash Mankato (Justen Overlander) and Aurora Galora (Meisha Johnson), Jeff must secure the HMG before Wratch and Klard can unleash its devastating power and wreak havoc upon all of existence! Each sentence in this paragraph ends with an exclamation point! Some of them with two!!

We’re not going to lie to you. No sick puppies will be rescued if you support us, it’s unlikely that we’ll cure any currently incurable diseases, and it’s doubtful we’ll discover the whereabouts of the lost Ark of the Covenant. That being said, we love animals, we are staunchly opposed to diseases of all kinds, and if we DO find the lost ark, when we open it, we won’t look at it, Marion. We’ll keep our eyes shut.

Our aim is to provide a couple hours’ diversion for moviegoers the world over—to let them, as the modern-day bard, Billy Joel, so aptly put it: “forget about life for a while.” Laughing their asses off quite likely will be a part of that experience as well and, getting back to those diseases we mentioned earlier, we all know that laughter is the best medicine.

What you will most certainly help accomplish with your donation is to give us a chance to let David kick Goliath’s backside once again, metaphorically speaking. Indie filmmakers are the proverbial little guy in this business, usually stuck making movies with whatever money they could amass from breaking into their own piggy banks, guilting their parents into paying them their retroactive allowances, and scrounging their couch cushions for spare change. Not that there’s anything wrong with that! Some fabulous stuff is created that way. But with “EarthBreaker!” we have a real chance at if not full-blown commercial then long-term cult-movie success if we can garner the funds to realize our creative vision without having to feed our crew ramen noodles and build our sets with masking tape and paper clips. Quite unfairly, we think, indie films are too often stuck at the bottom of the celluloid heap and wind up being seen by very few people, other than the family and friends of the cast and crew.

Whether it’s a comedy or drama, action or romance, making a movie is a costly endeavor. You’ve got cast and crew salaries. Camera, lighting and grip equipment. Set construction. Insurance. Legal fees. Computer hardware and software. Post-production services. Wardrobe. DVD/Blu-ray manufacturing. Festival submissions. Marketing materials. Location fees. It all adds up pretty quickly.

We need your help to make this film and get it seen by the viewing public. Our goal is to raise $200K, though we’ll resort to ramen noodles and paper clips if we have to. We’ll make this movie No Matter What—we’re too damned stubborn not to see this through. But wouldn’t you like to be able to scream at the top of your lungs as folks leave the theater, “That really funny movie you just saw? The one that made you laugh so hard you clutched your stomach in agony and slipped in a puddle of your own chortle-induced tears? You can thank me for that! I helped make it happen! You’re welcome!”

But, let’s face it, without adequate funding, this movie cannot reach its full potential. What’s more, even if it did turn out every bit as awesome as we believe it is destined to be but then we couldn’t afford to distribute it, chances are that neither you nor your friends would ever get to see itand there would go your bragging rights! Every single contribution made to this site will bring us that much closer to getting “EarthBreaker!” on the silver screen (or your own flat screen) in the very near future.

If we may be so bold, we’ll address a question you may be asking, and rightfully so: “Let’s say I help. How do I know you’re capable of making this movie, let alone finishing it?” We’re glad you asked. We the producers have successfully completed two feature films (“IceBreaker” and “Horror House”), both of which have received limited distribution. A third feature film (“The Bequeather”) is currently in post-production. If you bring our principal cast into the equation, as a team, we have participated in the successful completion of over twenty feature films. We’ve shown that we’re capable of making movies with limited resources. With our collective talent and experience—both in front of the camera and behind it—we can assure you that your donation will land in capable hands.

If you aren’t in a position to make a donation today, you can still help spread the word by Liking us on Facebook, sharing our posts, and inviting your friends to do the same: www.facebook.com/earthbreakermovie. The more who know about the project, the better. Not only will it help our fundraising cause, but it will also develop a fan base for when the movie is released.

If you’ve got that credit card in hand and you’re ready to jump onboard and make a donation, we are offering a variety of perks to thank you for your support, including: “EarthBreaker!” merchandise such as can coolers, hats, and T-shirts; autographed postcards; DVD/Blu-ray combos; autographed movie posters; even your name in the credits.

Thank you in advance. As you can see we’re taking a deadly serious approach to a wildly tongue-in-cheek movie. We promise we won’t let you down.

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I know this is a little off topic, but I’m going to be in this flick (in a small but, I’m assured, pivotal role), so please check it out. It’s unusual for me because it’s in color and not set in the 1950s!

EarthBreaker Art

Without a doubt, this is going to be a bust-a-gut laugh fest…once it gets made…with the help of insanely forward-thinking people with ultra-refined taste in sci-fi comedies who know a fabulous indie film project that deserves their backing when they see the teaser trailer for it. http://www.facebook.com/earthbreakermovie?ref=stream&__req=i

Or visit their website at www.earthbreakermovie.com.

Come January 27, 2013, MY BIRTHDAY by the way, the creators of “EarthBreaker!” will be launching their IndieGoGo campaign. Please follow them on Facebook or Twitter and consider giving whatever you can toward this worthy cause.

I’m not going to lie to you—no sick puppies will be saved, no disaster victims rescued, but some crazy-talented, extremely dedicated, super-creative people (including writer/director Chad Martin of “IceBreaker” and “Horror House” fame) will be given a chance to make their lifelong dream come true—and entertain thousands upon thousands of people at the same time—by successfully creating this film.

If you help out with spreading the word to sci-fi/comedy-loving friends and acquaintances, that’s a start. If, come Jan. 27, you toss them a few (or even not so few) bucks—they need $200K—you’re assured a place in heaven and guarantee yourself bragging rights for your involvement when this movie becomes an everlasting cult favorite in years to come.

The wonderful cast includes: Gary David Keast, Meisha Johnson, Justen Overlander, Dan Sjerven, Eric Lee, and John Hedlund. Several of these folks just finished filming “The Bequeather,” a Justen Overlander film with me in another supporting role. More on that one as the film gets its final editing completed.

“EarthBreaker” is brought to you by Streckfus Entertainment and Chad Martin, Eric Lee and Nick Evert, producers.

Tally, a Cairn/Westie/Schnauzer mix needs a new home. This 6 1/2 year old is a healthy, happy girl looking for a new family. If you are interested in Tally, please email Sue at lilwhiteterriers@hotmail.com

Tally1 Tally2

Here’s what Marc says about Tally

My family is looking to find a great home for our dog Tally.  Our one year old daughter has a severe allergy to pet dander and we haven’t had any luck over the past few months mitigating the dander in the house. So unfortunately, we have to try and find another happy home for Tally.

Tally is a 6 1/2 year-old “Avon Terrier” that we adopted when she was around 7 months old.  Basically, she is a Cairn/Westie/Schnauzer mix.  She has a great temperament and is very well behaved.  She walks well on a leash (although doesn’t like to share the sidewalk with another passing dog).  She is kennel trained and loves to lounge in there with the door open. She has been spayed and is up to date on all her vet visits. We went through several rounds of obedience training at K9 Coach when she was younger.  We can’t say enough good things about her and wish we didn’t have let her go. We live in the Mendota Heights area of the Twin Cities.

Must vent about today’s “Practically the Worst Day in Our Dogs’ [Westies Oliver, Blanche, Keely and Ambrose] History.”

We had our friend, Mitch Gonzales (the Christopher R. Mihm B-movie mask-maker guy), over to watch a Hammer Suspense film from the ’50s with us called “The Snorkel.” Terrible name, REALLY good movie.

Anyway, moments before Mitch arrived, Oliver got into some frozen foods my husband Anthony had put out on the porch so we could finally defrost our basement freezer. The naughty mutt stole a frozen 1/3-pound boneless pork filet. Pork is way too rich for dogs in general in that kind of quantity, and especially for his delicate digestion. We struggled, chase, cajoled, bribed and basically did everything we could to get that thing away from him for nearly an hour. I even offered him other kibble, a chicken wing, a walk and even a ride in the car, but he wouldn’t come out from under a shrub for anything—and that little sucker is FAST on his getaways.

Well, he finally finished devouring his pig dinner and came back in the house, only to start uncontrollably shivering, whining and finally howling for several minutes on end (he’s the only Westie I’ve EVER heard howl like that in my life). All of this was because his tummy was hurting. It was rather heart-breaking, but the doofus dog did it to himself. We put him out again and hoped he’d barf it all up.

Eventually, he must have because I later saw Ambrose eagerly eating something in the snow. Hot lunch, on ice!

All the while this is happening, I’m apologizing to Mitch for the awfulness of it all.

Then, we all sat down to a light lunch, and as we began the movie, Blanche proceeded to steal Anthony’s ham sandwich and start eating it on the couch. Luckily, Mitch alerted me in time to have me put most of it back together.

When Oliver came back in, the tummy-ache-based howling started up again, so Anthony put on a loop leash to guide out the dog again, and Mitch got to see the insane snarling and snapping Oliver is known for when he resisted being led. Score another point for good dog behavior around company. At least now Mitch knows I was never exaggerating when I said Oliver’s behavior could be downright dangerous when he loses it.

THEN, about halfway through the movie, Keely jumped up on the couch with me and Mitch and I smelled something I “hoped” was just her typical fart. But, no such luck. She had apparently had the runs outside and was toting a bunch of smeary pooh, as well as a rock-hard poop-hole plug, both of which I worked on for 15 minutes and used fully half a roll of toilet paper to thoroughly remove from her butt. Anthony got to scrub a spot of stinkiness off the sofa, too.

I’m sure Mitch was having the time of his life with this kind of Martha Stewart-esque hospitality! I was mortified to say the least. Fortunately, he loves dogs and understood. He’s even made plans to come back sometime and watch a few more such flicks. Glutton for punishment.

So how the heck was your day, honey?

Just in time for Halloween, read the exclusive interview with the King of New Old Good Bad Movies himself, Christopher R. Mihm, in this month’s “Screem” magazine.

http://screemag.com/index.php

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Universal’s stable of beloved monsters grace the cover of our 25th edition of Screem, courtesy of artist Mark Maddox. Greg Mank takes a look at the Classic Monster Blu-ray box set, and gives his perspective on the films that have inspired so many fans throughout several decades. Tom Weaver interviews Roger Corman on his first production, Monster from the Ocean Floor, Bev Vincent writes about Stephen King’s creepy anthology films and interviews Mark Pavia on his collaboration with Mr. King, The Reaper’s Image, Tippi Hedren reminiscences on the the 50th anniversary of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds, Scott Essman reflects back on Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein, Screem speaks with indie director Christopher R. Mihm, who creates new movies that look like they were produced in the 1950s, we take a sneak peek at the retro Sci-fi musical The Ghastly Love of Johnny X, which features Paul Williams and Kevin McCarthy in his final role, Michael “The Hills Have Eyes” Berryman is as creepy as ever in the new film Below Zero. All this plus book reviews, a new Fright Flick Pic and Blu-ray reviews featuring Criterion’s Rosemary’s Baby, Beyond the Black Rainbow, The Boogens, House and Night of Dark Shadows (reviewed by RJ Jamison), 1932’s The Most Dangerous Game, William Castle’s short lived TV series Ghost Story (AKA Circle of Fear), BFI’s Deep End and Juan of the Dead plus plenty more goodies await you in the brand new issue of Screem magazine!

As many of you know, I am a licensed wedding officiant and my business is called Nonconformist Nuptials. I write one-of-a-kind nondenominational ceremonies for those who dislike the typical cookie-cutter approach to weddings.

One of things I love to include in these ceremonies is the couples’ beloved pets. My dearly departed Westie, Ludwig, was the ring bearer in my wedding! To that end, I want to promote The Dog Perk (owned and operated by Tony and Amy Waara, colleagues of mine through the PetPAC business networking group) and their new line of wedding-focused dog bandanas.

Get a load of these terrific designs:

Learn what’s happening in the Mihmiverse, namely, the filming of his latest B-movie, “The Giant Spider.”

http://www.examiner.com/article/info-101-at-the-movies-198-further-observations-from-the-mihmiverse?CID=examiner_alerts_article

Many thanks to the fine folks who worked so tirelessly to bring visual arts to the Pine City, Minn., public in their 2nd Annual Highway 61 Film Festival. We were honored to have been present on Day 3 of the screenings to introduce writer/director Christopher R. Mihm’s B&W 1950s-drive-in-style B-movie homage to William Castle (The Tingler, House on Haunted Hill), House of Ghosts. We were even more pleased to be able to accept on his behalf the award for Best Action/Horror Feature Film! Mihm was unable to attend because he was busy filming his upcoming movie, The Giant Spider. From the cast and crew of House of Ghosts, we say THANK YOU!!

 

I’m also pleased to announce that I was awarded Best Actress award for the Murder Mystery Company’s production of “‘Til Death Do Us Part,” an interactive dinner-theater comdedy production at which I, an audience member, was “cast” as Anita Goodman (phonetically: I need a good man) the maid of honor. A delightful time was had by all, and I got this really cool certificate as a souvenir:

My hubby Anthony (“Reginald,” father of the bride) and me as the maid of honor.

Pets are more than just animals — they’re family. And anyone who’s ever lost a pet knows it’s terribly heartbreaking. Whether it’s your first time to lose a pet or your third, it never really gets easier, only more familiar. Thankfully, there are many ways to ease the sorrow and help you recover from such a devastating loss. If you or someone you know is suffering from the loss of a pet, then take a minute to read these seven tips to help you cope and return to a more peaceful state of mind.

  1. Allow yourself to grieve:

    One of the most important things you have to remind yourself of following the loss of a pet is that it’s important and perfectly OK to grieve. Everyone grieves in different ways and for different periods of time. It may last a few days or a few years. Either way, it’s a completely personal experience that may require taking off work or spending some time alone to bounce back.

  2. Express your grief openly:

    A big part of the healing process is expressing your grief openly. Don’t be afraid to talk about your feelings and memories. Holding it in will only make the grieving process more difficult and painful. This is especially important to remember when talking to your children about the loss of a pet. When explaining the situation, be sure to express your own grief and reassure your kids that it’s OK to be sad and that you also feel the same way.

  3. Spend time with your surviving pet:

    Spending time with your surviving pet can help you cope with grief and ease the pain of losing an animal. Surviving pets may need a lot of TLC at this time because they are also affected by the loss. Even if they weren’t close, your surviving pet may whimper and act lethargic because they are distressed by the sudden changes. Comfort your surviving pet and try to create a positive emotional state within the home.

  4. Do something in your pet’s memory:

    Whether it’s spending time at the park where you used to walk your dog, volunteering at an animal shelter, or making a donation in your pet’s memory, these special moments can help you turn a painful situation into a positive one. If you like to write, paint, or make music, you can dedicate it to your beloved pet.

  5. Keep a journal:

    Keeping a journal is one of the best things you can do to record your feelings, thoughts, and memories about your pet and keep track of your grieving process. Doing so will help you work through the grief and make sense of the things happening around you.

  6. Memorialize your pet:

    Memorializing your pet can help you overcome your loss and remember the good times you had together. You can have a memorial for your pet in private or with the company of friends and family. Some people write a letter to their pet or create a photo album and leave it by an urn or their pet’s burial spot. You can memorialize your pet on his or her birthday or anytime you feel like reminiscing.

  7. Seek support:

    Many people have been in your exact shoes and know what it’s like to lose a beloved pet. Seeking support is a healthy and encouraged way to cope with the death of a pet. There are many forms of support available to grieving pet owners, including pet-loss support hotlines, pet bereavement counseling services, and online support groups with chat rooms and message boards where people can tell their story and share comforting words. Support can also come from friends and family who knew your pet and can help you hold on to the good memories.

Animal-loving writers are invited to submit their pet-related short stories with a connection to Halloween to the Petlitzer Prize Contest by October 15, 2012. Winners will be announced live on the air on the Dog Works Radio Show on Halloween Eve.

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PRLog (Press Release)Sep 26, 2012
Love animals? Love to write? Love Halloween? Animal-loving writers are invited to submit their pet-related, Halloween-themed short stories to the Petlitzer Prize Contest. “The name ‘Petlitzer Prize’ just came to me one day, as a kind of play on words, a sort of Pulitzer for animal-related works,” said multiple-award-

winning author/animal chaplain, Sid Korpi, (“Good Grief: Finding Peace After Pet Loss,” http://www.goodgriefpetloss.com, named “Best Book of the Year in the Self-Help Category” by Premier Book Awards) who came up with this contest to recognize quality efforts in writing regarding animals and celebrating the human-animal bond.

Winners will receive certificates of recognition and will have their stories read by Korpi on “Dog Works” Blog Talk Radio (http://dogworksradio.com) in early June. The first-place winner also will receive a handsome medallion.

This round of the Petlitzer Prize contest is devoted to pet-related short stories of a Halloween-themed nature. Stories may be fiction or creative nonfiction, 400–700 words in length. The deadline for submission is October 15, 2012 with winners announced live on the Dog Works Radio show on or around Halloween Eve. There is no fee for entering, but only one submission per category is allowed.

Here are some basic ground rules for Petlitzer Prize entries in any or all categories:

1. You must be the author of the piece. Plagiarism is an absolute no no!

2. Entries should not have been previously published in book form (on your own blog is fine) as of the date you submitted it. Meaning that if you get it snatched up by Random House the week after you send it to me, you’re still qualified for this prestigious contest—and congratulations! 🙂

3. Entries must be received by October 15, 2012. A winner will be chosen, aired and posted by no later than Oct. 30. (I and a panel of pet experts, including but not limited to Dr. Robert and Michelle Forto, dog trainers and co-hosts of popular “Dog Works” Blog Talk Radio show, will be judging the submissions.)

4. Please be sure to have a second pair of eyes proofread your entries well. Grievous typos/grammar gaffs will most likely disqualify you.

5. You may only enter one piece in any given round, but you may enter a different single piece in every subsequent category throughout the year. New categories will be posted shortly after the after the deadline is reached.

6. Winners (First, Second, Third  and/or Honorable Mention, depending on the number and quality of submissions) will receive a certificate of achievement for their efforts and have their work posted on my blog, Facebook fan page, Twitter, etc. (As well as on the Dog Works sites.) First place winners also will receive a handsome medallion. If you have a website, please be sure to submit your URL to be directly linked from my blog in case you win.

7. Winners will also have their works (or excerpts from them) read live on Dr. Robert Forto’s very popular Blog Talk Radio show “Dog Works.” (Air dates will be announced in advance, and the show will be available thereafter in archived form.)

8. No pornography whatsoever will be allowed. Nor will pieces depicting gratuitous violence toward animals (except for the purpose of decrying such acts or as truly salient parts of a story’s plot). I have the final say as to whether entries will be accepted. People of all ages and walks of life may be seeing or hearing these, so the work must be acceptable for a general audience.

9. Send your submission in a Word doc or pasted directly into an email with “Petlitzer Prize Entry” in the subject line, along with your full name, email address, mailing address, phone number, and a short (sentence or two) bio about yourself if you wish, to me at goodgriefpetloss@gmail.com. I will forward only your actual submitted story with your name to my fellow judges. None of your contact information will be shared without your express permission. They’re only so I can notify you of who won the contest and/or to mail you your certificate.

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