Rocky and Melvin are still available for adoption. I have attached their photos again so you can see their sweet faces.
Older dogs often take longer to get placed in new homes just because of their age – Keep in mind that even though
these boys are considered “Senior” – they are a young 11. Many Westies don’t even begin to slow down at this age!

Does adopting an older dog scare you? Why?
Here’s some things to think about ….

Won’t I be adopting someone else’s problems? If the dog was so wonderful, why is it up for adoption?
……Answer:
Older dogs lose their homes for many different reasons….most of them having nothing to do with problems the dog has, but rather with those of the person or family surrendering the dog. Many folks think dogs who end up at shelters or in rescue are all genetically and behaviorally inferior. But, it is not uncommon for very expensive, well-bred, well-trained dogs to outlive their usefulness or novelty with folks who bought them on impulse and no longer want to take responsibility for them. 
Other reasons older dogs become homeless: death of a guardian….not enough time for the dog…… change in work schedule….. new baby…..need to move to a place where dogs are not allowed…. kids going off to college…. allergies…. change in “lifestyle”…. prospective spouse doesn’t like dogs

 

Isn’t it true that you can’t train an older dog the way you can train a puppy?
……Answer:
Dogs can be trained at any age. The old adage, “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” just isn’t true.  Older dogs are great at focusing on you—and on the task at hand—because they’re calmer than youngsters. Plus, all those years of experience reading humans can help them quickly figure out how to do what you’re asking.

 

Don’t older dogs cost more in vet bills?
…… Answer: Veterinary attention and medication are needed at all ages and may or may not be more costly for an older dog.

Do older dogs have any “special needs”?
…… Answer:
With a health assessment of the dog, you will know whether any age-related conditions are present and you can take appropriate measures to address them. Otherwise, older dogs need all the things younger dogs do — good nutrition, exercise (although less intensive, usually, than for a younger dog), and regular visits to the vet.

What advantages do older dogs have over puppies or young dogs?
……Answer:

Older dogs have learned what “no” means and how to leave the furniture, carpets, shoes, and other “chewables” alone.

They have been “socialized” and learned what it takes to be part of a “pack” and to get along with humans and, in most cases, other dogs, and in some other cases, cats, as well. 
Older dogs, especially those who have once known it, appreciate love and attention and quickly learn what’s expected of them to gain and keep that love and attention.

Older dogs know how to let you finish the newspaper, sitting calmly next to you, while your workday stress flows away and your blood pressure lowers.

They are also instant companions, ready for hiking, riding in the car, walking on leash, fetching, etc. 

Finally, older dogs are a “known commodity.” They are easy to assess for behavior and temperament, and you also don’t have to guess how big they’ll grow!

 

 

Those of you who adopted Westies that are no longer puppies often share with us how devoted and grateful they are. It’s an instant bond that cannot be topped!

 

Consider adopting an older dog….you will never regret it.

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